[an error occurred while processing this directive] [an error occurred while processing this directive] [an error occurred while processing this directive]
Français
‘Les déplacements à Tokyo

Taxis : Bien que propres et fiables, les taxis peuvent être chers durant la journée en raison de la lenteur de la circulation. Le trafic est toutefois moins dense en soirée, et lorsque les trains, les métros et les autobus cessent de fonctionner (vers minuit en général), les taxis peuvent constituer le seul moyen de transport. Contrairement à New York, Tokyo est résolument une ville dont l'activité ralentit la nuit, de sorte qu'en fin de soirée, les taxis peuvent se faire rares. Les tarifs applicables sont de 650 en (630 lorsqu'il s'agit de petites voitures) pour les deux premiers kilomètres et de 90 yen pour chaque tronçon supplémentaire de 280 (299) mètres, et de 80 yen par période de 100 (110) secondes lorsque les voitures progressent à moins de 10 km/h en raison de la densité de la circulation; ces tarifs augmentent de 30 % entre 23 h et 5 h. Si le taxi emprunte l'autoroute, il incombe au client de payer les frais de péage. Les taxis peuvent être hélés au passage ou obtenus à une station de taxis. Une lumière installée sur le tableau de bord et visible à travers le pare-brise permet de savoir si le taxi est libre ou non : rouge, elle indique que le taxi est libre; verte, elle indique que le taxi est occupé. Les chauffeurs ouvrent et ferment les portes pour leurs clients, et n'attendent pas de pourboire. Étant donné que ceux qui maitrisent l'anglais ou le français sont peu nombreux, il est préférable de noter sa destination par écrit en japonais ou de se munir d'une carte. Lorsque la destination est un endroit bien connu, par exemple un hôtel, il peut suffire d'indiquer la destination au chauffeur en s'exprimant lentement. Si vous voulez essayer de donner vos instructions en japonais au chauffeur, dites, par exemple : hôtel Okura onegai shimasu.

Métros : Le métro est un moyen de transport rapide, bon marché et facile à utiliser. À Tokyo, les noms des stations de métro sont indiqués en japonais mais aussi en romaji (caractères latins) sous les caractères japonais et les instructions sont aussi fournies en anglais. Il est indiqué de conserver sur soi une carte du métro (vous en trouverez une ci-joint). Des appareils, peints en couleurs vives et situés à proximité des portillons, permettent d'acheter des billets, et certains permettent de changer des billets de 1 000 yen. Les tarifs appliqués varient en fonction de la distance; dans le doute, achetez un billet au tarif le plus bas (160 yen pour la plupart des parcours) et laissez au contrôleur de la station où vous descendrez le soin de vous réclamer le supplément exigible, le cas échéant; vous devez conserver votre billet jusqu'à votre arrivée à destination. Les métros commencent à fonctionner aux environs de 5 h, passent fréquemment (toutes les deux ou trois minutes sur certains circuits) jusqu'à la fin du service, peu après minuit. La sécurité des personnes et des biens est à toutes fins utiles assurée dans les transports en commun de Tokyo. Pousser les autres voyageurs (lorsqu'il y a lieu) pour entrer et sortir des wagons aux heures de pointe fait partie des méthodes jugées acceptables. Des cartes murales indiquent les arrêts sur la rame et, dans les stations, des enseignes rédigées en romaji et affichées sur les plates-formes indiquent le nom de la station où le métro a fait halte ainsi que, généralement, ceux des arrêts précédent et suivant. Les circuits sont codés au moyen de couleurs (par exemple, toutes les indications et toutes les cartes relatives au circuit de Ginza figurent en jaune doré), et les wagons de la rame correspondante sont généralement peints de la même couleur. Les points de correspondance sont affichés sur des piliers des plates-formes, généralement en romaji et suivant le même code de couleurs. Des plans affichés à proximité et au-delà des portillons peuvent aider les voyageurs à s'orienter vers la sortie appropriée (par ex., B-1 ou A-4).

Autobus : Des autobus desservent généralement les principales gares. Toutefois, à moins que vous ne connaissiez le numéro de l'autobus que vous devez prendre et votre destination exacte, il est généralement plus facile de voyager en taxi ou en métro.


Les restaurants à Tokyo

Dans son livre Eating in Tokyo, Rick Kennedy estime qu'il y a à Tokyo plus de 80 000 restaurants. Les visiteurs qui y viennent pour la première fois sont frappés par le nombre et la variété des restaurants, des plus modestes aux plus élégants, que l'on trouve dans chaque quartier de cette ville fascinante. La cuisine japonaise y est représentée avec panache, et nous vous conseillons de vous laisser tenter par quelques-uns des mets que vous n'avez pas encore essayés. En plus de la cuisine japonaise, le gastronome pourra aussi déguster une excellente cuisine française (haute cuisine, nouvelle cuisine et cuisine bourgeoise) et italienne (des plats traditionnels à la nouvelle cuisine), tout aussi exquise qu'à Paris ou en Toscane. Des restaurants d'autres pays d'Europe, d'Amérique du Nord et d'Amérique latine ont aussi pignon sur rue. De nombreux établissements servent des spécialités asiatiques (surtout coréennes, indiennes et chinoises), dont la qualité va d'acceptable à très bonne. La restauration rapide de style américain est bien représentée. En règle générale, elle est au moins acceptable et souvent meilleure que son équivalent en Amérique du Nord. On trouve partout d'excellentes boulangeries et pâtisseries. Pour ceux qui préfèrent la cuisine de leur pays, Koji Vancouver est un restaurant canadien situé à Akasaka 2-14-27, Kokusai Shin-Akasaka Building, Higashi-kan, Minato-ku, Tokyo, tél. : 03-3583-5414.

La meilleure façon de trouver un bon restaurant est de se balader dans les rues avoisinant les principales stations de métro et gares de trains. Shimbashi et Toranomon, qui sont à dix minutes de marche de l'hôtel Okura, sont des quartiers réputés pour leurs restaurants et night-clubs; on y trouve des centaines de restaurants et de bars qui servent une incroyable variété de spécialités culinaires. De nombreux établissements ont en vitrine des modèles en plastique des plats qu'ils servent, appelés ryori mihon, ce qui donne généralement une bonne idée de la composition d'un plat. Le menu est parfois affiché à la porte, souvent en anglais. Si vous entrez dans un restaurant qui n'a pas de menu en anglais, demandez au serveur de sortir et montrez-lui ce que vous avez choisi dans la vitrine. Le repas de midi est beaucoup plus économique, surtout dans les restaurants haut de gamme où, le soir, il peut vous en coûter plus du double. Nombreux sont les restaurants où le déjeuner du jour est présenté sur une table près de la porte avec le prix affiché. Les restaurants abondent aussi dans d'autres quartiers du centre-ville : Roppongi, Akasaka, Azabu, Hiroo, Shinjuku, Shibuya, Aoyama, Yotsuya et Harajuku, tous desservis par le métro et le train.


Le magasinage à Tokyo

Tokyo est l'endroit rêvé pour les amateurs de magasinage : son édition de Born To Shop fait 326 pages! Il est impossible de même essayer de résumer tout ce qu'ont à offrir les milliers de magasins que compte cette ville. Voici cependant quelques suggestions, tout à fait arbitraires, de centres commerciaux facilement accessibles depuis l'hôtel Okura.

GINZA : Les boutiques de Ginza, l'un des quartiers les plus célèbres de Tokyo, sont élégantes, exclusives et pour la plupart très chères. Ce n'est pas là qu'on peut acheter des souvenirs, mais pour faire du lèche-vitrine, c'est l'idéal. Pour vous y rendre, prenez le métro ligne Hibya à la station Kamiyacho, qui est à cinq minutes de marche de l'hôtel Okura, jusqu'à la station Ginza. Les magasins les plus connus sont notamment Waco (une espèce de Birks, en plus chic) et Mikimoto (pour les perles - on peut regarder les étalages tout à loisir, les employés sont très polis et serviables même s'il est évident qu'on n'achètera rien; c'est fermé le mercredi). Quant aux grands magasins, les principaux sont Matsuya Ginza, Mitsukoshi (fermé le mercredi), Hankyu, Seibu et le Printemps, les deux premiers étant peut-être les plus célèbres et aussi les plus typiques de la région. La papeterie Itoya, fondée en 1904, plait particulièrement aux Canadiens, surtout ceux qui ont la passion des plumes, des cartes, du papier à lettres, des fournitures de bureau et des arts graphiques.

HARAJUKU : Certains estiment qu'il faut absolument voir ce quartier, qui est celui de la mode. Pour vous y rendre, prenez le métro ligne Hibiya à la station Kamiyacho, descendez à Kasumigaseki et prenez la ligne Chiyoda (ligne verte) jusqu'à Omotesando, vous êtes arrivé! Parmi les boutiques les plus importantes figurent notamment La Forêt, l'établissement Hanae Mori, Paul Stuart Japon, la Shu Uemura Beauty Boutique et l'Oriental Bazaar. Ce dernier magasin, qui est fermé le jeudi, est un bon endroit où acheter tous ses souvenirs d'un coup quand on manque de temps. Il y a de tout : des kimonos, des coffrets en laque, des vases ciselés, des objets en imari, satsuma et kutani, des perles, des estampes et un choix d'articles en papier japonais traditionnels. On y trouve aussi des produits à bon marché, comme des tee-shirts et des vestes « happi ».

AOYAMA : Non loin de Harajuku - on peut y aller à pied (ou en métro, ligne Ginza, jusqu'à la station Gaienmae) - se trouvent Bell Commons, Plantation (Issey Miyake), Brooks Brothers, Cerrutti 1881 et des douzaines d'autres établissements de créateurs et stylistes japonais et internationaux. L'un des plus intéressants est le Japon Traditional Craft Center (fermé le jeudi), qui est situé au deuxième étage d'un immeuble de bureaux et de commerces de détail. Outre les objets exposés en permanence et offerts à la vente, cet établissement présente en alternance des articles choisis provenant de diverses régions du Japon. Compte tenu de la qualité des produits et du choix disponible, les prix ne sont pas déraisonnables.

SHIBUYA : Ce centre commercial comporte un certain nombre de grands magasins, notamment Tokyu (Tokyu Honten est ce qu'il y a de mieux), Fashion 109, Seibu, Parco I, II et III. Si vous n'avez pas beaucoup de temps devant vous, nous vous recommandons Tokyu Hands, qui se qualifie lui-même de magasin de << création >>. L'un des plus grands centres d'artisanat et de bricolage de Tokyo, il comporte trois sections de huit étages chacune, et propose à la vente plus de 300 000 articles en tout. C'est le paradis du bricoleur. Pour vous y rendre, prenez le métro ligne Hibiya à la station Kamiyacho, jusqu'à Ebisu, où vous descendez pour prendre le train, ligne ferroviaire JR, jusqu'à Shibuya.


Adresses et numéros de téléphone utiles à Tokyo

GOUVERNEMENT DE L'ALBERTA
M. Jeff Kucharski
Directeur général, Japon
3e étage, Place Canada
3-37, Akasaka 7-chome
Minato-ku, Tokyo 107

Tél. : 3475-1171/3
Fax : 3470-3939

GOUVERNEMENT DE COLOMBIE-BRITANNIQUE
M. John Tak
Représentant principal
2e étage, Édifice Akasa KSA
8-10-39, Akasaka
Minato-ku, Tokyo 107

Tél. : 3408-6171
Fax : 3408-6340

GOUVERNEMENT DU QUÉBEC
M. Jean Dorion
Délégué général
5e étage, Édifice Kojimachi Hiraoka
1-3 Kojimachi
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102

Tél. : 3239-5137
Fax : 3239-5140

CONSEIL DES INDUSTRIES DE LA FORÊT (CANADA)
M. Edward Matsuyama
Directeur, Japon
Tomoecho Annex II 9F
3-8-27 Toranomon
Minato-ku, Tokyo 105

Tél. : 5401-0531
Fax : 5401-0538

CHAMBRE DE COMMERCE DU CANADA
M. Neil Moody
Directeur exécutif

Tél. : 3224-7824
Fax : 3224-7825



2009-12-09 XV


£ζ“ͺ‚Ι–ί‚ι [@–ί‚ι@]
[an error occurred while processing this directive]